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Response to question with answers underneath each question. Please find open attached file for homework details.
MS/NM Homework
1. When assessing a child’s neurovascular status of a casted limb, what are the key components in the nursing assessment?
2. When providing parent education for developmental dysplasia of the hip, what would the nurse include in the standard treatment plan and therapy for this disorder? 
3. Briefly describe the pathophysiology of cerebral palsy and describe the five goals of therapy for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). 
4. Children born with myelomeningocele (MM) require a multi-disciplinary approach to care.  Identify the team members that would be involved in a child’s care who has MM and describe the rationale for the team member’s involvement. 
5. Explain 5 key patient education strategies the nurse would include to parents whose child is being treated for “Club Feet”. 

2

3

Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing

TENTH EDITION

Marilyn J. Hockenberry, PhD, RN, PPCNP-BC,
FAAN
Bessie Baker Professor of Nursing and Professor of Pediatrics
Associate Dean for Research Affairs
Chair, Duke Institutional Review Board
Duke University
Durham, North Carolina

David Wilson, MS, RNC-NIC (deceased)
Staff
Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis
Tulsa, Oklahoma

Cheryl C. Rodgers, PhD, RN, CPNP, CPON
Assistant Professor
Duke University School of Nursing
Durham, North Carolina

4

5

Table of Contents

Cover image

Title Page

Copyright

Contributors

Reviewers

Dedication

Preface

Organization of the Book

Unifying Principles

Special Features

Acknowledgments

Unit 1 Children, Their Families, and the Nurse

1 Perspectives of Pediatric Nursing

Health Care for Children

The Art of Pediatric Nursing

Clinical Reasoning and the Process of Providing Nursing Care to Children and Families

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

2 Family, Social, Cultural, and Religious Influences on Child Health Promotion

General Concepts

Family Structure and Function

Family Roles and Relationships

Parental Roles

6

Parenting

Special Parenting Situations

Sociocultural Influences upon the Child and Family

Influences in the Surrounding Environment

Broader Sociocultural Influences upon the Child and Family

Understanding Cultures in the Health Care Encounter

Health Beliefs and Practices

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

3 Developmental and Genetic Influences on Child Health Promotion
Growth and Development

Development of Personality and Cognitive Function

Role of Play in Development

Developmental Assessment

Genetic Factors That Influence Development

Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Unit 2 Assessment of the Child and Family

4 Communication and Physical Assessment of the Child and Family
Guidelines for Communication and Interviewing

Communicating with Families

History Taking

Nutritional Assessment

General Approaches Toward Examining the Child

Physical Examination

Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

5 Pain Assessment and Management in Children

Pain Assessment

Assessment of Pain in Specific Populations

Pain Management

Common Pain States in Children

Review Questions

Correct Answers

7

References

6 Childhood Communicable and Infectious Diseases

Infection Control

Communicable Diseases

Intestinal Parasitic Diseases

Infections of the Skin

Systemic Disorders Related to Skin Lesions

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Unit 3 Family-Centered Care of the Newborn

7 Health Promotion of the Newborn and Family

Adjustment to Extrauterine Life

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

8 Health Problems of Newborns

Birth Injuries

Cranial Deformities

Common Problems in the Newborn

Nursing Care of the High-Risk Newborn and Family

High Risk Related to Dysmaturity

High Risk Related to Physiologic Factors

High Risk Related to Infectious Processes

High Risk Related to Maternal Conditions

Genetic Evaluation and Counseling

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Unit 4 Family-Centered Care of the Infant

9 Health Promotion of the Infant and Family

Promoting Optimal Growth and Development

Promoting Optimal Health During Infancy

NCLEX Review Questions

8

Correct Answers

References

10 Health Problems of Infants
Nutritional Imbalances

Health Problems Related to Nutrition

Skin Disorders

Special Health Problems

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Unit 5 Family-Centered Care of the Young Child

11 Health Promotion of the Toddler and Family

Promoting Optimal Growth and Development

Promoting Optimal Health during Toddlerhood

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

12 Health Promotion of the Preschooler and Family
Promoting Optimal Growth and Development

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

13 Health Problems of Toddlers and Preschoolers
Sleep Problems

Skin Disorders Related to Chemical or Physical Contacts

Skin Disorders Related to Animal Contacts

Thermal Injury

Ingestion of Injurious Agents

Child Maltreatment

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Unit 6 Family-Centered Care of the School-Age Child and
Adolescent

9

14 Health Promotion of the School-Age Child and Family

Promoting Optimal Growth and Development

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

15 Health Promotion of the Adolescent and Family

Promoting Optimal Growth and Development

Promoting Optimal Health during Adolescence

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

16 Health Problems of School-Age Children and Adolescents

Health Problems of School-Age Children

Health Problems of Adolescents

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Unit 7 Family-Centered Care of the Child with Special Needs

17 Quality of Life for Children Living with Chronic or Complex Diseases
Perspectives on the Care of Children and Families Living with or Dying From Chronic or Complex Diseases

The Family of the Child with a Chronic or Complex Condition

The Child with a Chronic or Complex Condition

Nursing Care of the Family and Child with a Chronic or Complex Condition

Perspectives on the Care of Children at the End of Life

Nursing Care of the Child and Family at the End of Life

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

18 Impact of Cognitive or Sensory Impairment on the Child and Family

Cognitive Impairment

Sensory Impairment

Communication Impairment

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

10

Unit 8 The Child Who Is Hospitalized

19 Family-Centered Care of the Child During Illness and Hospitalization

Stressors of Hospitalization and Children’s Reactions

Stressors and Reactions of the Family of the Child Who is Hospitalized

Nursing Care of the Child Who is Hospitalized

Nursing Care of the Family

Care of the Child and Family in Special Hospital Situations

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

20 Pediatric Variations of Nursing Interventions

General Concepts Related to Pediatric Procedures

Skin Care and General Hygiene

Safety

Positioning for Procedures

Collection of Specimens

Administration of Medication

Maintaining Fluid Balance

Alternative Feeding Techniques

Procedures Related to Elimination

Procedures for Maintaining Respiratory Function

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Unit 9 The Child with Problems Related to the Transfer of Oxygen
and Nutrients

21 The Child with Respiratory Dysfunction
Respiratory Infections

Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

Croup Syndromes

Infections of the Lower Airways

Other Infections of the Respiratory Tract

Pulmonary Dysfunction Caused by Noninfectious Irritants

Long-Term Respiratory Dysfunction

Respiratory Emergency

NCLEX Review Questions

11

Correct Answers

References

22 The Child with Gastrointestinal Dysfunction
Distribution of Body Fluids

Gastrointestinal Dysfunction

Inflammatory Disorders

Hepatic Disorders

Structural Defects

Obstructive Disorders

Malabsorption Syndromes

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Unit 10 The Child with Problems Related to the Production and
Circulation of Blood

23 The Child with Cardiovascular Dysfunction

Cardiovascular Dysfunction

Congenital Heart Disease

Clinical Consequences of Congenital Heart Disease

Nursing Care of the Family and Child with Congenital Heart Disease

Acquired Cardiovascular Disorders

Heart Transplantation

Vascular Dysfunction

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

24 The Child with Hematologic or Immunologic Dysfunction
Hematologic and Immunologic Dysfunction

Red Blood Cell Disorders

Defects in Hemostasis

Immunologic Deficiency Disorders

Technologic Management of Hematologic and Immunologic Disorders

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

25 The Child with Cancer

12

Cancer in Children

Nursing Care Management

Cancers of Blood and Lymph Systems

Nervous System Tumors

Bone Tumors

Other Solid Tumors

The Childhood Cancer Survivor

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Unit 11 The Child with a Disturbance of Regulatory Mechanisms

26 The Child with Genitourinary Dysfunction
Genitourinary Dysfunction

External Defects of the Genitourinary Tract

Glomerular Disease

Miscellaneous Renal Disorders

Renal Failure

Technologic Management of Renal Failure

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

27 The Child with Cerebral Dysfunction

Cerebral Dysfunction

Evaluation of Neurologic Status

The Child with Cerebral Compromise

Cerebral Trauma

Intracranial Infections

Seizure Disorders

Cerebral Malformations

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

28 The Child with Endocrine Dysfunction
The Endocrine System

Disorders of Pituitary Function

Disorders of Thyroid Function

Disorders of Parathyroid Function

13

Hypoparathyroidism

Disorders of Adrenal Function

Disorders of Pancreatic Hormone Secretion

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Unit 12 The Child with a Problem that Interferes with Physical
Mobility

29 The Child with Musculoskeletal or Articular Dysfunction

The Immobilized Child

Traumatic Injury

Sports Participation and Injury

Birth and Developmental Defects

Acquired Defects

Infections of Bones and Joints

Disorders of Joints

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

30 The Child with Neuromuscular or Muscular Dysfunction

Congenital Neuromuscular or Muscular Disorders

Acquired Neuromuscular Disorders

NCLEX Review Questions

Correct Answers

References

Answers to Critical Thinking Case Studies

Chapter 8

Chapter 10

Chapter 15

Chapter 16

Chapter 18

Chapter 19

Chapter 21

Chapter 22

Chapter 23

Chapter 25

Chapter 27

14

Chapter 28

Index

IBC

15

Copyright

3251 Riverport Lane
St. Louis, Missouri 63043

HOCKENBERRY: WONG’S ESSENTIALS OF PEDIATRIC NURSING, TENTH EDITION ISBN: 978-
0-323-35316-8

Copyright © 2017 by Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and
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and our arrangements with organizations such as the Copyright Clearance Center and the
Copyright Licensing Agency, can be found at our website: www.elsevier.com/permissions.

This book and the individual contributions contained in it are protected under copyright by the
Publisher (other than as may be noted herein).

Notices
Knowledge and best practice in this field are constantly changing. As new research and experience
broaden our understanding, changes in research methods, professional practices, or medical
treatment may become necessary.
Practitioners and researchers must always rely on their own experience and knowledge in
evaluating and using any information, methods, compounds, or experiments described herein. In
using such information or methods they should be mindful of their own safety and the safety of
others, including parties for whom they have a professional responsibility.
With respect to any drug or pharmaceutical products identified, readers are advised to check the
most current information provided (i) on procedures featured or (ii) by the manufacturer of each
product to be administered, to verify the recommended dose or formula, the method and duration
of administration, and contraindications. It is the responsibility of practitioners, relying on their
own experience and knowledge of their patients, to make diagnoses, to determine dosages and the
best treatment for each individual patient, and to take all appropriate safety precautions.
To the fullest extent of the law, neither the Publisher nor the authors, contributors, or editors,
assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products
liability, negligence or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, products,
instructions, or ideas contained in the material herein.
Nursing Diagnoses—Definitions and Classification 2012-2014. Copyright © 2011, 2009, 2007, 2005,
2003, 2001, 1998, 1996, 1994 by NANDA International. Used by arrangement with Wiley-Blackwell
Publishing, a company of John Wiley and Sons, Inc. In order to make safe and effective judgments
using NANDA-I nursing diagnoses it is essential that nurses refer to the definitions and defining
characteristics of the diagnoses listed in the work.

16

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17

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Contributors

Rose U. Baker PhD, PMHCNS-BC
Assistant Lecturer
School of Nursing
College of Health Professions
Akron, Ohio

Annette L. Baker RN, BSN, MSN, CPNP
Nurse Practitioner
Cardiovascular Program
Auburndale, Massachusetts

Raymond Barfield MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Christian Philosophy;
Director
Pediatric Quality of Life and Palliative Care
Duke University
Durham, North Carolina

Amy Barry RN, MSN, PNP-BC
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Leukemia and Lymphoma Service
Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center
Atlanta, Georgia

Heather Bastardi MSN, BSN, PNP
Heart Failure/Heart Transplant Coordinator
Boston Children’s Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts

Debra Brandon PhD, RN, CNS, FAAN
Associate Professor
School of Nursing
Duke University
Durham, North Carolina

Terri L. Brown MSN, RN, CPN
Assistant Director
Clinical Outcomes & Data Support
Texas Children’s Hospital
Houston, Texas

Meg Bruening PhD, MPH, RD
Assistant Professor
School of Nutrition and Health Promotion
College of Health Solutions
Arizona State University
Phoenix, Arizona

Rosalind Bryant PhD, RN, PPCNP-BC
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Texas Children’s Hospital;

18

Instructor
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, Texas

Cynthia J. Camille MSN, RN, CPNP, FNP-BC
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Pediatric Urology
Duke University Health System
Durham, North Carolina

Patricia M. Conlon MS, APRN, CNS, CNP
Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist;
Assistant Professor of Nursing
Mayo Clinic Children’s Center
Rochester, Minnesota

Erin Connelly APRN, CPNP
Aflac Cancer & Blood Disorders Center;
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia

Martha R. Curry MS, RN, CPNP
Instructor
Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology
Department of Pediatrics
Baylor College of Medicine
Texas Children’s Hospital
Houston, Texas

Amy Delaney RN, MSN, CPNP-AC/P
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Boston Children’s Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts

Sharron L. Docherty PhD, PNP-BC, FAAN
Associate Professor
School of Nursing;
Associate Professor
Department of Pediatrics;
Director
Center for Excellence in Cognitive/Affective Symptom Science
Duke University
Durham, North Carolina

Angela Drummond MS, APRN, CPNP
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner-Orthopedics
Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare
St. Paul, Minnesota

Jan M. Foote DNP, ARNP, CPNP, FAANP
Clinical Associate Professor
The University of Iowa College of Nursing
Iowa City, Iowa
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Blank Children’s Hospital
Des Moines, Iowa

Quinn Franklin MS

19

Manager
Child, Adolescent, and Young Adult Life Program
The University of Texas
MD Anderson Children’s Cancer Hospital
Houston, Texas

Debbie Fraser MN, RNC-NIC
Associate Professor
Faculty of Health Disciplines
Athabasca University
Athabasca, Alberta, Canada;
Advanced Practice Nurse, NICU
ST Boniface General Hospital
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Teri Lavenbarg MSN, APRN, PPCNP-BC, FNP-BC, CDE
Nurse Practitioner
Medical Center
University of Kansas
Kansas City, Kansas

Patricia McElfresh MN, RN, PNP-BC
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Hematology Oncology
Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
Atlanta, Georgia

Tara Merck CPNP
Director of Advanced Practice Providers
Children’s Specialty Group
Medical College of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Mary A. Mondozzi MSN, BSN, RN
Burn Center Education/Outreach Coordinator
Akron Children’s Hospital
The Paul and Carol David Foundation Burn Institute
Akron, Ohio

Rebecca A. Monroe MSN, RN, CPNP
Certified Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Medical City Children’s Hospital Urgent Care
Dallas, Texas

Kim Mooney-Doyle PhD, RN, CPNP-AC
Postdoctoral Research Fellow
School of Nursing
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Patricia O’Brien MSN, RN, CPNP-AC
Nurse Practitioner
Cardiovascular Program
Boston Children’s Hospital
Boston, Massachusetts

Cynthia A. Prows MSN, CNS, FAAN
Clinical Nurse Specialist, Genetics
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center

20

Cincinnati, Ohio

Patricia A. Ring MSN, RN, CPNP
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Pediatric Nephrology
Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Maureen Sheehan MS, CPNP
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Child Neurology and Epilepsy
Stanford Children’s Health
Palo Alto, California;
Clinical Faculty (Volunteer)
School of Nursing
University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, California

Anne Feierabend Stanton MSN, APRN, PCNS-BC
Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist
University of Kansas Medical Center
Kansas City, Kansas

Barbara J. Wheeler RN, BN, MN, IBCLC
Neonatal Clinical Nurse Specialist & Lactation Consultant
St. Boniface General Hospital;
Professional Affiliate
Manitoba Centre for Nursing & Health Research;
Instructor II
College of Nursing
University of Manitoba e-Health Services
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Kristina D. Wilson PhD, CCC-SLP
Senior Speech Language Pathologist and Clinical Researcher
Texas Children’s Hospital;
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Division of Plastic Surgery
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, Texas

21

Reviewers

Sharon Anderson MSN, NNP-BC, APNG
Instructor
School of Nursing
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Brigit M. Carter PhD, RN, CCRN
Assistant Professor;
Project Director
Health Equity Academy
Duke University School of Nursing
Durham, North Carolina

Enrique Chaves-Carballo MD
Clinical Professor, Departments of Pediatrics
and History and Philosophy of Medicine
The University of Kansas Medical Center
Kansas City, Kansas

Elizabeth Conoley RN, MSNEd, CPN
Assistant Professor
Brenau University School of Nursing
Gainesville, Georgia

Ciara Culhane MS, RN-BC, CPN
Professional Development Specialist
Children’s Hospital Colorado
Aurora, Colorado

Jacqueline Sayre Dorsey MS, RN, ANP
Assistant Professor
Nursing
Monroe Community College
Rochester, New York

Patricia A. Duclos-Miller MSN, RN, NE-BC
Professor
Capital Community College
Hartford, Connecticut

Stephanie C. Evans PhD, APRN, PNP
Assistant Professor, Nursing
Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences
Texas Christian University
Fort Worth, Texas

Kari Gali DNP, RN, CPN
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
Distance Health/MyCare Online
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland, Ohio

22

Bonnie Jensen RN, BSN, MSN
Faculty
Provo College
Provo, Utah

Christine B. Kavanagh RD, MSN, PNP-BC
Instructor
Nursing Programs
School of Health Sciences
Pennsylvania College of Technology
Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Ann Marie McCarthy RN, PhD, FNASN, FAA
Professor & Associate Dean for Research
College of Nursing
The University of Iowa
Iowa City, Iowa

Carmella Mikol PhD, CPNP, CNE, RN-BC
Instructor
College of Lake Country
Grayslake, Illinois

Deborah A. Roberts MSN, EdD
Professor and Chair
Department of Nursing
Sonoma State University
Rohnert Park, California

Nicole Shonka MS, RN-BC, CPN
Professional Development Specialist
Children’s Hospital Colorado
Aurora, Colorado

23

Dedication

We dedicate the tenth edition of this book to David Wilson who passed away on March
7, 2015, after a long battle with cancer. David had been co-author of the Wong nursing

textbooks for over 15 years. He was known as an expert clinical nurse and nurse
educator. His last clinical position was at St. Francis Health Services in Tulsa, Oklahoma,

where he worked in the Children’s Day Hospital as the coordinator for Pediatric
Advanced Life Support (PALS).

Students and faculty have recognized David’s contributions to the Wong textbooks for
many years. He was known as an outstanding educator and supporter of nursing

students; his attention to clinical excellence was evident in all this work. Those who
contributed to the books and had the opportunity to work with David realize the

important role he played as a leader in nursing education for students and faculty. His
clinical expertise provided a critical foundation for ensuring relevant and evidence-based

content was used in all the Wong textbooks. David led by example in exemplifying
excellence in clinical nursing practice.

Those who knew David well will miss his humor, loyalty to friends and colleagues, and
his never-ending support. He is missed greatly by those who worked closely with him on

the Wong textbook over the years. Most importantly we miss his friendship; he was
always there to support and to encourage. We have lost an amazing nurse who worked
effortlessly over the years to improve the care of children and families in need. David

will not be forgotten.

24

Preface

Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing has been a leading book in pediatric nursing since it was first
published almost 40 years ago. This kind of support places immense accountability and
responsibility on us to earn your future endorsement with each new edition. So, with your
encouragement and constructive comments, we offer this extensive revision, the tenth edition of
Wong’s Essentials of Pediatric Nursing. This tenth edition continues the legacy of Donna Wong and
David Wilson; our beloved colleagues. We hold dear their contributions and memories of their
pursuit of excellence in all they did for the Wong textbooks.

To accomplish this, Marilyn J. Hockenberry, as editor-in-chief, along with Cheryl Rodgers, co-
editor, and many expert nurses and multidisciplinary specialists, have revised, rewritten, or
authored portions of the text concerning areas that are undergoing rapid and complex change.
These areas include community nursing, development, immunizations, genetics, home care, pain
assessment and management, high-risk newborn care, adolescent health issues, end-of-life care, and
numerous pediatric diseases. We have carefully preserved aspects of the book that have met with
universal acceptance—its state-of-the-art research-based information; its strong, integrated focus on
the family and community; its logical and user-friendly organization; and its easy-to-read style.

We have tried to meet the increasing demands of faculty and students to teach and to learn in an
environment characterized by rapid change, enormous amounts of information, fewer traditional
clinical facilities, and less time.

This text encourages students to think critically. New to this edition is a change in the format and
content for nursing care plans throughout the book. We have developed case studies that discuss
clinical scenarios allowing the student to visualize how the care plan develops as a clinical situation
evolves over time. The Critical Thinking Case Studies ask the nurse to examine the evidence,
consider the assumptions, establish priorities, and evaluate alternative perspectives regarding each
patient situation. The Critical Thinking Case Studies support our belief that the science of nursing
and related health professions is not black and white. In many instances, it includes shades of gray,
such as in the areas of genetic testing, resuscitation, cultural issues, end-of-life care, and quality of
life. Revised evidence-based practice boxes include the latest knowledge crucial for nurses to
practice using quality and safety competencies. Competencies included in the evidence-based
practice boxes are designed specifically for prelicensed nurses and are from the Quality and Safety
Education for Nurses website.

This text also serves as a reference manual for practicing nurses. The latest recommendations
have been included from authoritative organizations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics,
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Institute of Medicine, the Agency for
Healthcare Research and Quality, the American Pain Society, the American Nurses Association, and
the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Associates and Practitioners. To expand the universe of
available information, websites and e-mail addresses have been included for hundreds of
organizations and other educational resources.

25

Organization of the Book
The same general approach to the presentation of content has been preserved from the first edition,
although some content has been added, condensed, and rearranged within this framework to
improve the flow; minimize duplication; and emphasize health care trends, such as home and
community care. The book is divided into two broad parts. The first part of the book, Chapters 1
through 16, follow what is sometimes called the “age and stage” approach, considering infancy,
childhood, and adolescence from a developmental context. It emphasizes the importance of the
nurse’s role in health promotion and maintenance and in considering the family as the focus of care.
From a developmental perspective, the care of common health problems is presented, giving
readers a sense of the normal problems expected in otherwise healthy children and demonstrating
when in the course of childhood these problems are most likely to occur. The remainder of the
book, Chapters 17 through 30, presents the more serious health problems of infancy, childhood, and
adolescence that are not specific to any particular age group and that frequently require
hospitalization, major medical and nursing intervention, and home care.

UNIT ONE (Chapters 1 through 3) provides a longitudinal view of the child as an individual on
a continuum of developmental changes from birth through adolescence and as a member of a
family unit maturing within a culture and a community. Chapter 1 includes the latest discussion of
morbidity and mortality in infancy and childhood and examines child health care from a historical
perspective. Because unintentional injury is one of the leading causes of death in children, an
overview of this topic is included. The nursing process, with emphasis on nursing diagnosis and
outcomes and on the importance of developing critical thinking skills, is presented. In this edition,
the critical components of evidence-based practice are presented to provide the template for
exploring the latest pediatric nursing research or practice guidelines throughout the book.

This book is about families with children, and the philosophy of family-centered care is
emphasized. This book is also about providing atraumatic care—care that minimizes the
psychologic and physical stress that health promotion and illness treatment can inflict. Features
such as Evidence-Based Practice, Family-Centered Care, Community Focus, Research Focus, Drug
Alert, and Atraumatic Care boxes bring these philosophies to life throughout the text. Finally, the
philosophy of delivering nursing care is addressed. We believe strongly that children and families
need consistent caregivers. The establishment of the therapeutic relationship with the child and
family is explored as the essential foundation for providing quality nursing care.

Chapter 2 provides important information on the family, social and cultural and religious
influences on child health promotion. The content clearly describes the role of the nurse, with
emphasis on cultural and religious sensitivity and competent care.

Chapter 3, devoted to the developmental and genetic influences on child health continues to
provide the latest information on genetics and also focuses on a theoretic approach to personality
development and learning.

UNIT TWO (Chapters 4 to 6) is concerned with the principles of nursing assessment, including
communication and interviewing skills, observation, physical and behavioral assessment, health
guidance, and the latest information on preventive care guidelines. Chapter 4 contains guidelines
for communicating with children, adolescents, and their families, as well as a detailed description of
a health assessment, including discussion of family assessment, nutritional assessment, and a sexual
history. Content on communication techniques is outlined to provide a concise format for reference.
Chapter 4 continues by providing a comprehensive approach to physical examination and
developmental assessment, with updated material on temperature measurement, body mass index–
for-age guidelines, and the latest World …