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I have two lesson plans that need to be enhanced to include certain requirements. 
These are the requirements.

Detailed evidence of planning for effective questioning with increasing complexity
Assessments aligned to learning objectives and learning activities and adapted to student needs
Modifications and accommodations targeted for deficit areas, includes language accommodations as well as those for special needs
The overall lesson plan – scaffolded instruction, aligned in rigor, developed to address all student needs

Included are the 2 lesson plans, the rubric of how this assignment will be graded, and an exemplar lesson plan that you can also use. 
The focus should be on the questioning part of the lesson plan, as well as creating modifications and accommodations for any type of student. and scaffolded instruction.

6.3E Multiply and Divide Positive Rational Numbers Fluently

NAME: Efrain Rivera SUBJECT/GRADE: 6th Grade Math

TEKS: 6.3E Multiply and Divide Positive Rational Numbers Fluently

LEARNING OBJECTIVE(S):
The students will apply mathematical process standards to divide and multiply positive rational numbers. They will know the order of operations and practice several problems that also include subtraction and addition, in different orders.

ASSESSMENT: Given two challenges, the learner will be able to solve a problem that includes the multiplication and division of positive rational numbers. The Assessment will be given in Google Classroom in a Google Form. The learner is required to submit the form by the end of class.

MATERIALS and SETTING

Materials: Pencil, internet connection, paper, computer access to join Zoom meeting of teacher. White board and dry-erase marker are also an option to draw necessary visuals.

KEY VOCABULARY and ACADEMIC LANGUAGE

Key Vocabulary: divisor, remainder, quotient, division, dividend, addition, subtraction, and order of operations (PEMDAS)

FOCUS ACTIVITY

The focus activity will be on learning the methods of division and multiplication by taking the learners through a comprehensive course syllabus. The focus is to determine the order of operations, multiplying rational numbers, and the steps of dividing by a rational number that includes decimals.

CONNECTION TO PRIOR LEARNING

The process of dividing rational numbers has a connection to the knowledge of multiplying and dividing whole numbers. We can also include the connections of adding and subtracting positive rational numbers.

OBJECTIVE STATEMENT

(Including a performance behavior)

The main objective will be to ensure that learners have fully understood the concept of division of rational numbers including decimals and fractions. This will enable them to solve more challenging and complex problems in the future. The students will complete the problems given by the instructor to assess the understanding levels in an acceptable and respectful manner.

PURPOSE OF LEARNING

The students need to know the concepts of multiplying and dividing positive rational numbers to enable them to solve more complex problems in the future. Multiplication and Division are the foundation for greater concepts in the coming months and years. By building a great foundation now, we can ensure the learner has a better chance of success in their field of study.

INSTRUCTIONAL STEPS

Include:

Step by step instructions
Key points
Directions to give

1. Teacher reviews problem from the previous day. This is based on the addition and subtraction of positive and negative rational numbers. This is a similar problem that was given the day before, used to refresh the memory of the student and guide them to the new learning.
2. Review the problem and go over any misconception.
3. Introduction to new ideas, definition of purpose, outlines the objective.

3. Introduce new concepts or methods. This can be achieved by showing a video tutorial of the process. Here the teacher will show a video of the process of solving a math equation that has multiplication and/or division. Because the student has previously learned about addition and subtraction, we can also introduce the concept of Order of Operations. There will be a more thorough lesson the following day.
4. The next step would be an example problem by the teacher.
5. The next step would be a problem that those students do with the teacher. I would ask for volunteers and cold call students.
6. The next step would be for the students to team up and solve a problem in a group.
7. The next step would be the student to show a demonstration of learning. We will give a Google form for the students to fill out.

Various differentiated instructional strategies will be used in this case to ensure that all the students understand the concept being taught in class. The first strategy that will be used will be the use of teamwork.
The students will be grouped randomly and given questions that they should tackle as a group. The students will conduct the group work via Google Classroom. Any member of the group will be picked randomly to present the work. Since the group work will be graded, the group members in each group will ensure that all the members understand the questions. The individual work that will be turned in after the lesson in Google form will be used to show whether there is a student who has not understood the concept after the group work.
After the group work, the instructor will as the students to ask any questions that they might be having to ensure that all issues are clarified before attempting the individual work.

In this step, students usually say they don’t have any questions. My approach is not to ask if they have questions, I will say to them that they need to ask 2 good questions about the topic as part of their assignment. This gives them a way to think more critically about the topic and come up with great questions.

LITERACY STRATEGIES USED

The literacy strategy that will be used is the use of real-life scenario to demonstrate the concept of division of rational numbers.
This is a great way to show the practical use of math. My goal is to always be informed of all the interests of the students, that way I can bring math to their world.
Another literacy strategy that will be used is teaching of Math vocabulary. That will ensure that the students grasp the concepts that are taught better.
I can use a game for this strategy. By gamifying the learning, the students become more invested and challenge each other to be better. The learning can be in a new game that is introduced, or part of the bigger ongoing class game.
Moreover, the instructor should make connections between what the kids already know and what they are being taught.

STUDENT USE OF TECHNOLOGY

Students are required to know how to use technology, and this will enable them to be able to attend the class effectively. We will be on zoom so they students are able to draw on their device with the annotation tool. This allows them to display their thinking to the entire class at once.
Additionally, the instructor will use a video to ensure that the students learn how to multiply and divide rational numbers effectively.
Flocabulary.com and MathAntics.com are great Resources.

Additionally, the students will be taught how to use online tools to better understand the topic. There are many websites that can use number lines, positive and negative chips for addition, and scaling tools for multiplication and division. Include DISD provided tool accessible through Google Slides Add-Ons.

6 QUESTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING

1 per Bloom’s Level; Identify levels of Blooms

Questions should increase in complexity as lesson progresses

1. What is division and multiplication? (Remembering)
2. What are the steps used in division of rational numbers? (Understanding)
3. Are multiplication and division the only ways to solve the same problem? (Applying)
4. How do we know what order to solve each operation? (Analyzing)
5. Explain a situation where we would add before we multiplied. (Evaluating)
6. How can division of rational numbers be used to distribute food in out cafeteria? (Creating)

MODIFICATIONS/ACCOMMODATIONS

The teacher will use another example just to reinforce what was taught through reviewing the concepts that were not understood.
There are many EL students in the class, it may be necessary to translate any misunderstood concepts.

RETEACH/EXTENSION

The teacher can reteach or extend the lesson if the students did not understand the concept clearly in the class. This extension can be added after the We Do problem. We can go back to a reteach or move forward to the You Do.

CLOSURE

Review:

Connect to future learning

At the ends of the lesson, the teacher will connect ideas, concepts, and skills together with the lesson objectives. Also, the teacher will discuss the usefulness of what was studied. We will also take a few minutes to look forward to the next day, where we dive more into the order of operations that also includes negative rational numbers.

TEXAS TEACHERS LESSON PLAN FORMAT

NAME: Efrain Rivera SUBJECT/GRADE: 6th Grade Math

TEKS: 6.2(B) Identify a number, its opposite, and its absolute value.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE(S):
Today the learner will be able to identity a number, its opposite, and its absolute value. The learner will use know to use a number line when necessary. They will also be familiar with the vocabulary that instructs them to find an opposite or absolute value of a number.

ASSESSMENT: Given two challenges, the learner will be able to identify a number, its opposite, and its absolute value. The Demonstration of Learning will be two questions at the end of class. The Assessment will be given in Google Classroom in a Google Form. The learner is required to submit the form by the end of class.

MATERIALS and SETTING

Materials: Pencil, internet connection, paper, two rulers, computer access to join Zoom meeting of teacher. White board and dry-erase marker are also an option to draw necessary visuals.

KEY VOCABULARY and ACADEMIC LANGUAGE

Key Vocabulary: Opposite number, negative, positive, positive number line, zero, absolute value, direction.

FOCUS ACTIVITY

The focus activity will be on learning the opposite of an integer and the absolute value of that integer. We will draw our number lines and look for the integer. We will then find our absolute value and the opposite. After we review this, we will get together with our elbow partner and practice some problems given by the teacher.

CONNECTION TO PRIOR LEARNING

Students will review the previous knowledge of the number line and the location of positive and negative numbers that has been taught in the past two weeks. We have an option of drawing a vertical or horizontal, both of which we have reviewed before.

OBJECTIVE STATEMENT

(Including a performance behavior)

Students will continue to study the concept of absolute value and opposite numbers. The students will complete the problems given by the instructor to assess the understanding levels in an acceptable and respectful manner.

PURPOSE OF LEARNING

The students need to know the main concept of absolute value and opposite that will enable them to solve more complex problems in the future. Absolute value is a concept of distance, which we will expand on in Math and Science classes.

INSTRUCTIONAL STEPS

Include:

Step by step instructions
Key points
Directions to give

1. Teacher reviews problem from the previous day. This is based on the number line and simplifying expressions. This is a similar problem that was given the day before, used to refresh the memory of the student and guide them to the new learning.
2. Review the problem and go over any misconception.
3. Introduction to new ideas, definition of purpose, outlines the objective.
3. Introduce new concepts or methods. This can be achieved by showing a video tutorial of the process. Here the teacher will show a video of the absolute value of a few numbers and how they are drawn on the number line. We will also review opposites of rational numbers including fractions, decimals, negatives, and positives.
4. The teacher would also bring up the concept of opposites and the idea of them having the same absolute value. They are the same distance from zero, thus making them opposites.

5. The next step would be an example problem by the teacher.
6. The next step would be a problem that those students do with the teacher. I would ask for volunteers and cold call students.
7. The next step would be for the students to team up and solve a problem in a group.
8. The next step would be the student to show a demonstration of learning. We will give a Google form for the students to fill out.
9.
Differentiated instructional strategies will be used to ensure that all the students understand the concept that is being taught in class. In this case, the instructor will use a mini activity lesson. The students will be asked to have two identical rulers. They will be asked to ensure that the ruler touches each other at their zero-mark. They will be asked to label the ruler on the left negative and to label the rule on the right positive. Since the rulers are identical, the students will understand the concept of the number line more easily. They will be asked to count the same spaces to the right and left of the touching point of the two rulers to identify the opposite numbers. This instructional strategy will ensure that the students understand the concept of opposite numbers more effectively as they will be doing the exercise practically.
All the students will start with the ruler. Some will use smaller numbers where they can prove the distance to zero, and the advanced students will receive higher numbers and decimals as well. Eventually all students will be introduced to positive and negative decimals inside the absolute value.
The instructor will clarify any questions that the students will be having during the exercise.

LITERACY STRATEGIES USED

Review of terms and solving of complex problems through the use of real-life examples.
Another literacy strategy that will be used is to ensure that the students understand all the vocabulary that is used in the topic. That will make them understand the concept easily and differentiate between the different concepts that have been taught.
The instructor will also begin by reminding the students what was learned previously. That will enable the students to understand the concept being taught more easily thus making the students ready to learn the next concept that will be taught.

STUDENT USE OF TECHNOLOGY

Students are required to know how to use technology, and this will enable them to be able to attend the class effectively. We will be on zoom so they students are able to draw on their device with the annotation tool. This allows them to display their thinking to the entire class at once.
The instructor will use a video to ensure that the students understand the concepts that are being taught in the class. Additionally, the instructor will provide several links to YouTube that the students will use to view videos of the concept that has been taught in class to promote their understanding. The use of technology will ensure that the students understand the concepts being taught in class well.

6 QUESTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING

1 per Bloom’s Level; Identify levels of Blooms

Questions should increase in complexity as lesson progresses

1. How do we create a number line? (Remembering)
2. What are the steps used in finding absolute value and opposites? (Understand)
3. How can we draw the concept of absolute value on a number line? (Apply)
4. Are there any materials that might aid in the understanding of the absolute values? (Analyze)
5. What is the usefulness of the concept of absolute value and usefulness of opposites? (Evaluate)
6. How can we check the and make sure the next class understands the concepts we have learned today? (Create)

MODIFICATIONS/ACCOMMODATIONS

Students will be required to still engage in the steps that they are familiar with. For example, when dividing or multiplying numbers after they have been set up for that step.
There are many EL students in the class, it may be necessary to translate any misunderstood concepts.

RETEACH/EXTENSION

The teacher can reteach or extend the lesson if the students did not understand the concept clearly in the class. This extension can be added after the We Do problem. We can go back to a reteach or move forward to the You Do.

CLOSURE

Review:

Connect to future learning:

At the ends of the lesson, the teacher will connect ideas, concepts, and skills together with the lesson objectives. Also, the teacher will discuss the usefulness of what was studied. We will also take a few minutes to look forward to the next day.

Evaluation: Scoring Rubric

CRITERIA Expert (10 pt) Proficient (9 pts) Developing (8 pts) Novice (6 pts)

Questioning Explicit and

detailed

opportunities

for authentic

engagement

through an

anticipatory

set, student

collaboration,

and/or writing

activities.

Small group

instruction

fully supports

learning

objectives,

activities and

outcomes.

Instructional

examples,

teacher

modeling, or

other input is

detailed and

explicitly

supports the

objective and

lesson

activities.

Explicit

evidence of

consideration

of teacher’s

role

throughout

the lesson

(facilitator,

direct

instruction,

specialist,

etc.).

Multiple

strategies for

Meaningful opportunities
for authentic engagement
through an anticipatory set,
student collaboration,
and/or writing activities.

Specific evidence of
planning for small group
instruction (content for
different groups, mini-
lesson objectives, etc.)
where applicable.

Instructional examples,
teacher modeling, or other
input is specifically aligned
with objective and lesson
activities.

Teacher’s role (facilitator,
direct-instruction, specialist,
etc.) is considered and
apparent throughout the
lesson.

Specific opportunities for
student collaboration,
problem solving and
creativity in lesson activities
or outcome products.

Adequate opportunities for
authentic engagement using
an anticipatory set, student
collaboration, and/or writing
activities.

Adequate evidence of
planning for small group
instruction (content for
different groups, mini-lesson
objectives, etc.) where
applicable.

Instructional examples,
teacher modeling, or other
input is adequately aligned,
but may lack detail or be
loosely supportive of the
objective and lesson
activities.

Some opportunities for
student collaboration,
problem solving and
creativity in lesson activities
or outcome products.

Limited
opportunities for
authentic
engagement
through an
anticipatory set,
student
collaboration,
and/or writing
activities.

Instructional
examples, teacher
modeling, or
other input is not
aligned with
objective or
lesson activities.

Minimal
opportunity for
student
collaboration.

learning

lesson content

are available

to students.

Meaningful

opportunities

for student

collaboration,

problem

solving and

creativity in

lesson

activities or

outcome and

products. May

include

nontraditional

activities, or

assessments.

Assessments and
the Overall Plan

*Assessment
provides detailed
information about
student learning.

*Explicitly
matches
objective(s),
learning activity
and outcomes.

*Detailed
information about
the type of
assessment,
formal:
(constructed
response/selected
response/etc.) or
informal:
(observation,
discussion, journal
writing, etc.).
*Assessment is
adapted for
diverse student
needs and offers
valid information
about student
learning.

*Assessment provides
meaningful information
about student learning.

*Matches objective(s),
learning activity and
outcomes

*Adequate information
about the type of
assessment, formal:
(constructed
response/selected
response/etc.) or informal:
(observation, discussion,
journal writing, etc.).

*Assessment includes some
adaptations for diverse
student needs

*The overall plan is well-
developed, flows smoothly
from beginning to end;
most aspects of the plan are
aligned in rigor, detailed
information is developed to
address most learner needs.

*Assessment provides
adequate information about
student learning.

*Is consistent with
objective(s), learning activity
and outcomes.

*Adequate information
about the type of
assessment, formal:
(constructed
response/selected
response/etc.) or informal:
(observation, discussion,
journal writing, etc.).

*The overall plan is
adequately developed, flows
somewhat smoothly from
beginning to end; most
aspects of the plan are
adequately aligned in rigor,
information is developed to
address some learner needs.

*Assessment
provides minimal
information about
student learning.

*Is loosely
connected to the
objective(s) and
learning activity
and outcomes

*Minimal
information about
the type of
assessment,
formal:
(constructed
response/selected
response/etc.) or
informal:
(observation,
discussion, journal
writing, etc.).

*The overall plan
is poorly
developed, is dis-
jointed with little
flow from
beginning to end;
few aspects of the

* The overall plan
flows smoothly
from beginning to
end; all aspects of
the plan are
aligned in rigor;
explicitly detailed
information is
developed to
address all learner
needs.

plan are
adequately
aligned in rigor,
little to no
information is
developed to
address learner
needs.

Accommodations
and
Modifications

*All
accommodation
needs have been
specifically
identified.

*Accommodations
(learning aids,
graphic
organizers, oral
administration,
etc.) and/or
modifications
(alternate
material, activity
or grade level
content) are
detailed and
explicitly designed
for the needs of
the student
population (ELL,
Sped, GT, etc.)

*Area for
accommodation
or modification
(content, process,
product, learning
environment) has
been specifically
identified.

*Accommodations
and Modifications
explicitly match
skill deficits.

Technology is
efficiently utilized

*Student needs are
adequately identified.

*Accommodations (learning
aids, graphic organizers,
oral administration, etc.)
and/or modifications
(alternate material, activity
or grade level content) are
detailed and appropriately
designed for the needs of
the student population (ELL,
Sped, GT, etc.).

*Area for accommodation
or modification (content,
process, product, learning
environment) is apparent.

*Accommodations/Modifica
tions mostly align with skill
deficits.

*Where appropriate,
technology may be used for
accommodation/
modification.

*When possible,
accommodation and/or
modification allows for
student learning of the
content at a level
comparable to peers.

*Student needs are loosely
identified.

*Accommodations (learning
aids, graphic organizers, oral
administration, etc.) and/or
modifications (alternate
material, activity or grade
level content) are listed and
adequately based on the
needs of the student
population (ELL, Sped, GT,
etc.)

*Area for accommodation or
modification (content,
process, product, learning
environment) is identified,
but may not be specific.

*Accommodations/modificati
ons loosely match skill
deficits.

*Some evidence of
technology use for
accommodation/
modification may be
apparent.

*Little or no
evidence of
accommodations

*Accommodations
(learning aids,
graphic
organizers, oral
administration,
etc.), or
modifications
(alternate
material, activity
or grade level
content) as
appropriate based
on specific
student needs
(ELL, Sped, GT,
etc.)

for
accommodation
and modification
where
appropriate.

*Accommodation
and/or
modification
allows for student
learning of the
content at the
highest level
appropriate for
each individual

TEXAS TEACHERS LESSON PLAN FORMAT

NAME: New Teacher SUBJECT: Grade 7 Language Arts

TEKS: (6) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about

the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

(B) analyze the development of the plot through the internal and external responses of the characters, including their

motivations and conflicts; and

(C) analyze different forms of point of view, including first-person, third-person omniscient, and third-person limited.

LEARNING OBJECTIVE(S): The student will analyze the development of the plot through the internal and external responses of

the characters, including their motivations and conflicts, and analyze different forms of point of view, including first-person,

third-person omniscient, and third-person limited by selecting from a group of tasks that include creating a character analysis

cut-out or poster, acting out a character in a presentation, or pretending to be the author of a book during an interview.

ASSESSMENT: With the assistance of a peer, students will create a mock interview and presentation in which each student

will discuss how they created a character in the book. Students must identify the four aspects of characterization and how

they pertain to the character. Students will submit the interview and present to the class for evaluation.

MATERIALS and SETTING

Small groups (3 – 4) determined by the teacher
Notebook paper, pencil, colored pencils for ‘tweet sheet’, paper sack, objects for the bag
Thirsty, Burger Wuss, The Chocolate Wars, Feed, and Refugee books

KEY VOCABULARY and
ACADEMIC LANGUAGE

Review definitions for analyze, plot, internal/external responses, character, characterization,
point of view

FOCUS ACTIVITY

Students will create a character chart from two poems (“The Peanut Butter King” and “Sarah
Cynthia Sylvia Stout Would Not Take the Garbage Out.” to review ‘static’ and ‘dynamic’
characterizations.

CONNECTION TO PRIOR
LEARNING

Students will review the four different characterization concepts we have learned in the last
two weeks.

OBJECTIVE STATEMENT

Students, today we will continue our study of characterization, plot development and point
of view. You will complete a project of your choice for the final assessment of your
understanding of characterization and the role of plot and point of view in characterization.

PURPOSE OF LEARNING

This is important for us to know so we can understand how writers utilize characters to
impact story lines, and in real life, helps us recognize how other people impact our lives.

INSTRUCTIONAL STEPS

Include:
Step by step instructions
Key points
Directions to give

1. Review: I will review the different characterization concepts with the students prior to
starting them on the activity. These concepts include antagonist and protagonist,
dynamic vs. static, round vs. flat, and the difference in implied and explicit character
traits.

2. Focus Activity: Students will complete the poetry activity to help them distinguish
between static and dynamic characters.

3. Activity: Students will be completing three different learning stations that solidify some
of the concepts of point of view and characterization. I will explain the station
requirements for each station before releasing them to work.

**While students are working on this, I will be pulling some students for a tier one re-teach
of the concepts before they complete an activity.

Station 1: Students will “become” a character from their group independent reading
assignment (each group has been reading one of the following books: Thirsty, Burger
Wuss, The Chocolate Wars, Feed, and Refugee). On a piece of notebook paper,
students will write down 10 adjectives that describe themselves as the character
from the book. Students will then list ten more adjectives for two other characters in
the book from the point of view of the character they have become.

Station 2: Students will be completing the “Tweet Sheet” activity. Students have to
write tweets for different characters to point of view on the different conflicts in the
short story. Students may choose any of the following short stories: “Luck,” “Old
Man on the Bridge,” and “The Other Wife.” Students will annotate these stories on
the iPads using Scrible. They can read independently to practice their
comprehension, and then share their findings and notes as a group. After groups
finish discussing, they will work on their “Tweet Sheets.”

Station 3: Students will write paragraphs from their personal point of view about a
particular object. They will then write a second paragraph from the point of view of
that particular object. These objects will be in a paper sack so that they cannot see
what they are grabbing. Tomorrow, students will take turns reading the paragraph
from the point of view of their object.

4. Station Completion: Following completion of the stations activity, I will ask the Post-

Questions to clarify any misconceptions and prepare students for their project choices.
This assignment will be due in two days.

5. Assessment: Handout project choices for students. Students will be completing a project
of their choice for the final assessment of their understanding of characterization and
the role of plot and point of view in characterization. Each project listed is differentiated
to fit different learning styles. Here is a link to this assignment:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1G8HfB059W4VKAiSB8z9AHXT-
Ash5eJw4/view?usp=sharing

6. Closure: To review, we will list three types of point of view and some of the
characteristics of each type. Students will also be sharing what they remember about the
different characterization concepts before we leave class. They will not have to write it
down for an exit ticket today. I will take notes on who seems sure of their responses and
who else might need Tier1/Tier 2 instruction.

7. Connect to Future Learning: Students will be using the concepts covered in this lesson as
we begin our novel study of A Wrinkle in Time.

LITERACY STRATEGIES Vocabulary review; characterization chart; adjective review Station 1; point of view Station 2
and 3

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1G8HfB059W4VKAiSB8z9AHXT-Ash5eJw4/view?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1G8HfB059W4VKAiSB8z9AHXT-Ash5eJw4/view?usp=sharing

STUDENT USE OF
TECHNOLOGY

Scrible annotation – Station 2;

QUESTIONS FOR
UNDERSTANDING
Identify levels of Blooms

Pre-Questions:
• What are some of the key differences between direct and indirect characterization?

Analyze
• What are some ways to determine whether a trait is an implied or explicit

characteristic? Evaluate, Create
• What are some of the different details that make up the characteristics of a

character? Remember
Post Questions:

• What are you the things that you are most comfortable with discussing about
characterization and its relationship to other literary elements moving forward?
Evaluate

• What are some things that you think that we should practice more before we begin
our study? Create

MODIFICATIONS/
ACCOMMODATIONS

Modifications: IEP and ELL students will have their sentence stem lists for the writing
portions of the stations. IEP students will also work on their paragraphs with the teacher
during study hall tutorials.

Accommodations: IEP/504 Students will be able to type the written portion of these
assignments.

RETEACH/EXTENSION Reteach: Students who are struggling with the Point of view and characterization concepts
will be pulled during this lesson for tier one instruction. We will begin by having students list
different adjectives to describe each of the members of the group. After listing the different
adjectives, we will discuss whether these are implied traits or explicit traits. Since most will
be explicit, I will be giving them some examples of implied traits by helping them find ways
to assume certain traits (ex: they can assume that I am also a coach because I generally come
to class in wind pants or they can assume that a class mate is on the basketball team because
they wear tennis shoes every day).
The final aspect of this lesson will be for students to read the short story “Old Man on the
Bridge.” We will read together and take our notes on Scrible using the iPad. We will discuss
the different characters in the story and label them as flat/round and tell whether they are
static or dynamic characters. After we finish this, students will complete a “Tweet Sheet” for
one of the characters in the book.
Extension: Students who are ready to move on will be completing the creative writing
characterization activity. This assignment is NOT for a grade, but it can be used to replace a
student’s two lowest grades. Here is a link to that assignment:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1O8iP5ZjzhfOXuhISI24kaErOpenwl8ru/view?usp=shari
ng

CLOSURE
Review
Connect to future learning

Review: We will list out the three types of Point of View and some of the characteristics of
each type. Students will also be sharing what they remember about the different
characterization concepts before we leave class. They will not have to write it down for an
exit ticket today. I will take notes on who seems sure of their responses and who else might
need tier 1/tier 2 instruction.

Connection to Future Learning: Students will be using the concepts covered in this lesson as
we begin our novel study of A Wrinkle in Time.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1O8iP5ZjzhfOXuhISI24kaErOpenwl8ru/view?usp=sharing

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1O8iP5ZjzhfOXuhISI24kaErOpenwl8ru/view?usp=sharing