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If you could not get to work because you had no car, you might decide that the best solution to this problem would be to purchase a vehicle. In that case, you could easily see the value of your purchase, as it would immediately solve your challenge of not being able to go where you needed to go. But have you ever been faced with the option of purchasing a good or service for which you could not immediately identify a need? What convinced you of the ultimate value of the purchase? What problem did it solve, or what aspect of your life did it improve?Marketers use the value proposition to demonstrate the appeal of their specific product or service to customers by showing them how it will deliver benefits, meet a need, or solve a problem. This is an important concept for businesses, as it is a way to gain competitive advantages in the marketplace. But what makes a value proposition successful? In this Discussion, you and your colleagues will seek to answer that question.To prepare for this Discussion:Think about a product or service that has enhanced your life by solving a problem. What is it about that product or service that has made life better or easier for the people who use it? If you were asked to present a compelling argument for why others should use that particular product or service, how might you go about it?Locate a marketing campaign that you believe to be a successful presentation of the value proposition for a product or service.Review the Academic Writing Expectations for 2000/3000-Level Courses, provided in this week’s Learning Resources.By Day 3Post either a link to or some representative image(s) of your selected marketing campaign. In 150–225 words (2–3 paragraphs), address the following:Explain who the target customers are for this product or service and why you believe this campaign to have been successful.What approaches or tactics do you think the marketers used to effectively reach the target customers and demonstrate the value of this product or service?To support your response, be sure to reference at least one properly cited scholarly source.
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Academic Writing Expectations: 2000-/3000-Level Courses
Students develop academic writing skills over time. In each course, students gain more understanding
about how to use appropriate and relevant content to develop and explore ideas in writing. Walden
undergraduate students should demonstrate awareness of context and audience in written
assignments. In 2000-/3000-level courses, students must be able to (a) display sentence- and paragraphlevel writing skills while practicing essay-level skills and (b) use evidence to support a claim in an
academic argument and give credit in writing to the source. Walden uses APA style guidelines to give
credit to sources. Walden students must carefully proofread all work before submitting assignments. In
each course, students develop and improve a revision process that contributes to quality composition.
A. Display sentence-, paragraph-, and essay-level skills.
Sentence-level skills include awareness of grammar and punctuation rules. Paragraph-level skills involve
use of evidence for idea (thesis) development. Students should practice essay-level writing skills,
including the use of transitional material and organizational frames. Students should display awareness
of discipline-specific conventions particular to a writing assignment, including academic expression,
presentation, and stylistic choices appropriate to an academic audience.
B. Use evidence from research to support a claim and give credit to the source.
In-Text Citations Overview: In general, in-text citations allow you to use evidence to support a claim by
crediting the source of the evidence. Examples of evidence include statistics, quotations, and other data
that you find when you are conducting research on a topic. The following are several ways to use
evidence while adhering to APA citation rules.
© 2015 Laureate Education, Inc.
1
Short Quotation With Signal Phrase
A “signal phrase” appears at the beginning of a sentence that includes the name of the author.
According to Jones (2010), “Students must practice writing in an academic voice” (p. 11). Note how the
publication year comes immediately after the author’s name and the page number remains at the end
of the quoted material.
Short Quotation Without Signal Phrase
Quotations from authors can be used with or without signal phrases.
Research on learning how to write at the college level revealed that “the fastest way to learn academic
writing is to read articles that are written in a scholarly voice” (Williamson, 2011, p. 22). When the
author’s name does not appear in the sentence, every component goes at the end of the quoted
material.
Paraphrase
A paraphrase occurs when you do not quote a source directly, but when you use ideas from a source
and restate them in your own words.
According to Williamson (2010), students who want to write in an academic voice should read scholarly
journal articles. Note that the idea is the same as the above, but the wording belongs to the author
rather than to Williamson.
Variation for Two Authors
“Writing is the foundational skill of the online classroom” (Gilmer & Walsh, 2012, p. 33). According to
Gilmer and Walsh (2012), students who learn in asynchronous settings write more than brick-and© 2015 Laureate Education, Inc.
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mortar students do, and the skill is practiced in classes that are not focused on composition. In the
parenthetical citation, you use an ampersand, but in the essay, you use the word “and” in the
introductory content.
Variation for More Than Two Authors
“A goal of the Walden Writing Center is to help all students compose comfortably” (Cook, Marshall, &
Pezalla, 2012, p. 44). For students to become comfortable in writing, it is essential to support them and
provide them with clear academic writing expectations throughout their academic journey (Cook et al.,
2012). Note how all author names are written out in the first citation, but in the second citation, the
abbreviation “et al.” is used.
© 2015 Laureate Education, Inc.
3
Week 1 Assignment Template
The Value Proposition of Marketing
[Your Name Here]
Walden University
Part 1: The Value Proposition of
Marketing
Marketing and the Value It Creates for
Customers: 1 of […]
[Explain what the marketing concept is and how it
creates value for customers. (2–3 slides)]
Marketing and the Value It Creates for
Customers: 2 of […]



[Continue from the previous slide]
[Update the Title with the total number of slides
for this question.]
[Add a third slide if necessary. If a third slide is
added, update the title in it to reflect “3 of 3.”]
The Value of Marketing to an
Organization: 1 of […]
[Describe how marketing is essential to an
organization in terms of value creation and the
achievement of business objectives. (2–3 slides)]
The Value of Marketing to an
Organization: 2 of […]
• [Continue from the previous slide]
• [Update the Title with the total number of slides
for this question.]
• [Add an additional slide if necessary. If a third slide
is added, update the title in it to reflect “3 of 3.”]
Marketing and Promoting Positive
Social Change: 1 of […]
• [Identify two to three ways that marketing can
promote positive social change (including
influencing habits, values, laws, etc.). Include
specific examples. (1–2 slides)]
• [Add an additional slide if necessary. If a second
slide is added, update the title in it to reflect “2 of
2.”]
Customer Wants Versus Needs: 1 of
[…]
[Distinguish between customer wants and needs.
How are they different from the perspective of a
marketing manager? Include visual examples of both.
(2–3 slides)]
Customer Wants Versus Needs: 2 of
[…]



[Continue from the previous slide]
[Update the Title with the total number of slides
for this question.]
[Add a third slide if necessary. If a third slide is
added, update the title in it to reflect “3 of 3.”]
Part 2: The Customer Experience
Value Proposition for a Product or
Service: 1 of […]
[Describe the role of the value proposition for a
selected product or service offered by Local Goods
and Services. (3–4 slides)]
– What product or service does this company offer?
– Who are the target customers for this product or
service?
– How is this product or service important to the
customers?
– How can this product or service improve the
customers’ lives?
– Does this product or service fulfill the customers’
wants or needs? Explain.
Value Proposition for a Product or
Service: 2 of […]


[Continue from the previous slide]
[Update the Title with the total number of slides
for this question and with your selection of
Product or Service (remove brackets).]
Value Proposition for a Product or
Service: 3 of […]


[Continue from the previous slide]
[Update the Title with the total number of slides
for this question and with your selection of
Product or Service (remove brackets).]

[Add a fourth slide if necessary. If a fourth slide is
added, update the title in it to reflect “4 of 4.”]
Strategies for Building Long-Term
Customer Relationships: 1 of […]
[Identify traditional and digital strategies to build
long-term relationships with these target customers.
(3–4 slides)]
– How would you plan to promote the product or
service to the primary customers?
– How would these promotional tactics encourage
unnecessary spending?
– How would these tactics encourage long-term
customer relationships?
Strategies for Building Long-Term
Customer Relationships: 2 of […]


Continue from the previous slide]
[Update the Title with the total number of slides
for this question.]
Strategies for Building Long-Term
Customer Relationships: 3 of […]


Continue from the previous slide]
[Update the Title with the total number of slides
for this question.]

[Add a fourth slide if necessary. If a fourth slide is
added, update the title in it to reflect “4 of 4.”]
References
[Include a reference list at the end of your
presentation, just as you would in a paper. Include a
minimum of two scholarly references. Reference list
entries take the same format they would in a paper:
Jones, P. (2004). This great book. New York, NY:
Publisher.
Smith, W., & Cat, D. (2010). How to make a good
presentation great. Presentations Quarterly,
45(4), 56–59. doi:10.123.45/abc]

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